Cádiz Cruises

Seville 
Cadiz and the Flamenco show
Legendary white villages of Andalusia

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Cadiz/Seville

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Cádiz, an old Spanish settlement in Andalusia, is characterised by a multitude of historical watchtowers. The port city rewards its visitors with excellent beaches, UNESCO World Heritage Sites, ancient cathedrals, and a fascinating old town. This MSC Mediterranean Cruises destination is a gateway to spectacular Seville. Further afield, discover the dazzling White Villages of Andalusia high up in the hills.

 
MSC Cruises excursions offer plenty of exciting things to see including:
 
• Seville 
• Cadiz and the Flamenco show
• Legendary white villages of Andalusia
 
Visit the stunning city of Seville on an MSC Cruises excursion to immerse yourself in its colour and culture. Stop at Saint Mary of the See, the Gothic Cathedral, before exploring the charming streets and patios of the old Jewish Quarter. Call by the Alcázar, the ancient royal palace, to glimpse a fine example of Mudéjar architecture. Next, explore Maria Luisa's Park and the iconic Plaza de España, before joining the locals for a drink and some tapas.
 
After docking the port of Cádiz, explore the city and savour its rich history. The city is home to one of the oldest Spanish settlements and is located in the heart of Costa De Luz. Choose an MSC excursion to explore the city’s Baroque, Rococo and Neoclassical elements. Keeping the best until last, the tour highlight is a live flamenco show. This authentic demonstration of Andalusia's traditional dance ends your tour before returning you to your ship.
 
See the legendary White Villages of Andalusia on an MSC Cruises excursion. Visit the ancient hilltop city of Medina Sidonia, where you’ll enjoy a guided tour along cobbled passageways. Marvel at the town’s ancient castle, medieval walls, and charming whitewashed houses. Then, continue your adventure at Arcos de La Frontera, a village perched on a limestone promontory. An electric train will take you to the town centre, where you’ll wander a labyrinth of streets filled with Arabic-influenced architecture. Finally, enjoy some free time further exploring before returning to the port.

Must see places in Cadiz

Discover our excursions

    Reach the port

    Port of Cadiz

    This section contains information on how to reach the port.

    Cruise Terminal:

    Puerto de la Bahía de Cádiz
    Darsena de Cádiz
    Plaza de España 17  11006

    Reach the port by

    • Car

      Coming from the North (Seville and Jerez), take the AP-4 Barcelona to Cadiz motorway and exit at the junction signposted for the City Centre (Centro Ciudad – Plaza de España 17). 

      Coming from the Costa del Sol (Malaga), take the A7 motorway and turn off onto the A-381 motorway at the Los Barrios exit, heading towards Jerez de la Frontera. Take the AP-4 just outside Jerez de la Frontera in the direction of Cadiz and exit at the junction signposted for the City Centre (Centro Ciudad – Plaza de España 17).
      Car
    • Train

      There is a local train from the main San Fernando–Bahia Sur Station to the Cadiz city centre station on Plaza de Sevilla.
      There is also a bus service to the city centre, on two runs run by the T. G. Comes company: M – 010 and M – 011. These buses run every 20 minutes.
      Taxis are available from outside the station.
      Train
    • Plane

      Jerez Airport is a 48 km (30-mile) journey from Cadiz City Centre and Port.
      There is a taxi rank immediately outside the airport building.
      Several bus services link the Airport, Jerez del Frontera city centre and Cadiz.
      Plane

    Spain

    Love at first sight
    Love at first sight

    If you’re visiting Spain for the first time, be warned: this is a country that fast becomes an addiction. You might intend to come just for a cruise holiday, a walking tour or a city break, but before you know it you’ll find yourself hooked by something quite different – the celebration of some local fiesta, perhaps, or the otherworldly architecture of Barcelona.

    Even in the most over-touristic Mediterranean resorts of the Costa del Sol, you’ll be able to find an authentic bar or restaurant where the locals eat, and a village not far away where an age-old bullfighting tradition owes nothing to tourism. 


    A holiday to Spain can also show you the large cities of the north like Barcelona, which have reinvented themselves as essential cultural destinations (and don’t all close down for hours for a kip every afternoon). 


    And when the world now looks to Spain for culinary inspiration – the country has some of the most acclaimed chefs and innovative restaurants in the world – it’s clear that things have changed. Spain, despite the current economic uncertainty, sees itself very differently from a generation ago. 

    So should you – prepare to be surprised.